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How to access support for a neurodiverse child

What is neurodiversity?

Neurodiversity is a term used to describe differences in the way some people think, learn and interact compared to others. Such variations are the result of how the human brain is ‘wired’ – which impacts the way we behave and perceive the world.

It’s estimated that around one in seven people in the UK are neurodiverse – and for some, it can mean extra support is needed to help with certain things.

 

Types of neurodiversity

Neurodiversity can take many forms and includes:

Autism: This is a lifelong ‘spectrum’ disorder – involving a wide range of symptoms that vary in severity – which can contribute to learning disabilities and mental health problems. A child with autism may find it difficult to understand how people think and feel, and have trouble communicating or socialising with others.

Dyslexia: This is a learning disorder that involves difficulty with reading, writing and spelling. A child with dyslexia may read or write slowly, string words or sentences together in unusual ways, and find it hard to interpret written information.

Dyspraxia: The key feature of dyspraxia is impaired movement and coordination. A child with dyspraxia may have trouble with playground games and physical activities that involve keeping their eyes and hands coordinated, such as catching or kicking a ball. They may also experience difficulties in handwriting, drawing, using scissors, and walking up and down stairs.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): This is a common behavioural disorder that involves difficulty with sitting still, concentrating, or switching between tasks and activities. A child with ADHD may display hyperactive and impulsive behaviours that might be considered excessive or inappropriate (where symptoms are severe).

If you think your child may be affected by any of the conditions listed above, try talking to a GP or health professional as soon as possible. They can refer your child for an assessment by specialists who are experts in detecting and diagnosing neurological conditions.

 

Getting help and support

If you work, or have worked, for a UK bank and would like to speak to someone for help with supporting a neurodiverse child, please call our free Helpline on 0800 0234 834. We’re open 9am - 5pm, Monday to Friday (except bank holidays).

  • BWC support for children with autism

    If your child is on the autism spectrum, we may be able to help by referring you to one of our expert partners for specialist advice and guidance. Through our support services, you can:

    • Receive guidance on how to get a diagnosis for your child
    • Talk through support options that are available for your child
    • Get help with receiving extra support from your child’s school
    • Recommendations for and help with obtaining specialist equipment, such as a tablet/laptop or aids and adaptations

    We can also help with accessing statutory support for your child, through social care services.

    For more information on autism, you can visit the National Autistic Society’s website.

  • BWC support for children with dyslexia

    If your child has dyslexia, we can make a referral for you to receive specialised information and advice on supporting their learning from one of our expert partners. This could include:

    • An initial appointment to discuss your child’s needs
    • Guidance on how to get a diagnosis for your child, and in some cases, we may be able to help with costs associated with an assessment
    • Personalised support by telephone and email
    • Referral for further specialist services
    • Recommendations for and help with obtaining specialist educational equipment, such as a tablet or laptop

    We can also help with accessing statutory support for your child, through social care services.

    For more information on dyslexia, you can visit the British Dyslexia Association's website.

  • BWC support for children with dyspraxia

    If your child is affected by dyspraxia, we can help by referring you to one of our expert partners for information and advice on supporting them at home and at school. This could include:

    • Guidance on how to get a diagnosis for your child
    • An assessment to understand areas of difficulty for your child and how they can be supported
    • A treatment programme involving sessions with an occupational therapist to develop your child’s coordination skills and help them become more independent
    • Help with obtaining specialist educational equipment, such as tablets and laptops

    We can also help with accessing statutory support for your child, through social care services.

    For more information on dyspraxia, you can visit the NHS website.

  • BWC support for children with ADHD

    If your child has ADHD, we can make a referral for you to receive specialist advice and guidance on managing the condition, from one of our expert partners. This could include:

    • Telephone and email support to answer any questions you may have about helping a child with ADHD
    • Guidance on how to get support from specialist organisations 

    We can also help with accessing statutory support for your child, through social care services.

    For more information on ADHD, please visit the NHS website.

We offer a range of services to current and former bank employees. Please see below for more support.

More support

  • Our support services

    The Bank Workers Charity exists to support current and former bank employees. Find out more about the services and support we provide.
  • How to check your benefits

    This simple benefits calculator helps you find out if you’re entitled to means-tested benefits. And it’ll indicate if you’re entitled to non-means tested benefits too.

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